Frame Fashion 2021

Everyone’s tired of the WFH aesthetic of sweats and daytime pajamas so it’s no surprise that this season fashion is back with a vengeance. Clothing wise I’m excited about colorful knitwear, particularly sweaters featuring crochet granny squares – cool, nerdy, and nostalgic all at the same time. I’m on the fence with the chunky loafer look for shoes, it evokes memories of the early nineties and I’m not convinced I want to go back there…. 

So what’s doing in the eye biz world in terms of fresh and new for fall? The September 2021 edition of Eyecare Business calls this fashion season “unexpected”. Here’s a rundown of the top seven trends in frames for this season:

  1. Geometrical and fanciful shapes – we’ve seen a lot of hexagons in both metal and plastic frames – it’s a totally fresh shape and super trendy.
  2. Edgy glamour – Big frames, unique tints and cool shapes, especially in sunglasses
  3. Logos are back – not everyone likes someone else’s name on their frames, but seriously, who doesn’t love an obscenely gigantic logo on an equally gigantic frame – the bigger the better!
  4. Cat-eye shapes – I’m not convinced this trend ever really goes away. Whether subtle or bold, the upward taper of the frame at the top edge is super flattering for any cheekbone.
  5. Twee – this is a trend that is a British term for dainty, sweet, or cutesy styles. It includes berets, pom-pom hats, pussy bows, and pleated skirts. Frame wise this means bubblegum pinks or any sugary hues. 
  6. 80’s – Think oversized, tons of crystals and more brow bars. Now this is an era I’m happy to go back to!
  7. Animal prints – Again, I’m not sure this trend is ever out of style. Aside from classic leopard prints, think zebra, you can’t go wrong with classic black and white. 

National Sunglasses Day

ball shaped beach blur close upWho doesn’t love sunglasses? After all, how many fashion accessories can also claim to be important medical devices? Whether you prefer glamorous or sporty, classic or trendy, sunglasses are a fashion statement that never goes out of style. In honor of National Sunglasses Day which takes place on June 27, here are a few facts about sunglasses that might be new to you.

Size matters. This season has seen a trend in “micro” sunglasses both on celebs and on the catwalk. Don’t be lured into this fad  – not only do the eyes themselves need UV protection, so does the whole lid area and all the skin around the eyes in order to prevent melanoma. Also, do you really want to revisit nineties fashion?  

Kids need sunglasses too. Because children have naturally larger pupils (pupil = that dark hole in the center of the eye that lets light in) more harmful UV rays reach their retinas and can cause future damage. Also interesting is the fact that kids are short and tend to look up more to see the world which causes them to look into the sun more often than adults. Parents are reluctant to spend money on kids sunglasses because kids lose stuff. A lot. One easy way around this is to make sure that kids who wear prescription glasses get photochromic lenses – the ones that magically morph into sunglasses when exposed to sunlight – no keeping track of a second pair. Kids that don’t wear prescription glasses will be excited to wear a cool grown up accessory and wearing them on a strap is a sporty way to make sure they don’t get lost.

artistic cloth design flagJust because sunglasses are dark does not mean they have UV protection! In fact many of those cheap sunglasses you buy off street vendors are tinted but have no UV and are even more dangerous than not wearing anything at all. If the glasses are dark your pupil will open up even wider to let more light in, but since there is no UV in the lens, it allows more dangerous light into the eye. Sunglasses don’t need to be expensive but they do need to have UVA and UVB protection which should be indicated by a sticker on the sunglasses.

No matter what your motivation is, be it hiding from the paparazzi or just sporting a posh headband, quality sunglasses are a fun investment in your eye health.

For more information on National Sunglass Day visit
http://nationalsunglassesday.com/sunglasses/